Allentown Roofing Repair and Installation

Allentown Roofing Repair and Installation

City Roofing Buying Guide for Allentown

The following city buying guide is designed to provide the basic information you need when undertaking a new roofing project. It is a general resource of things to do, watch out for, understand, and question throughout the process. Use this checklist as a guide through the basic steps from getting a permit and hiring a contractor to the materials available and unforeseen situations. Each step plays a pivotal role in securing a safe, secure, and properly installed roof that meets the standards for the building code in Allentown.

  • Allentown Climate
  • Building Permits
  • Hiring a Contractor
  • Types of Roofing Materials
  • Other Considerations

Allentown Climate Considerations for New Roofing

There are many things to consider when having a new roof installed and the weather in your area is one of them. The reason is some roofing materials do better in some parts of the U.S. than others. This is a point you’ll want to discuss with your contractor before purchasing the material.

Allentown receives approximately 201 days of sunshine each year and 121 days of rain. Compared to the U.S. average of 37 inches of rain per year, Allentown receives 42 inches. The city averages 25 inches of snowfall. Temperatures range from the mid-80s for the high and 24 degrees for the low. The humidity comfort index is 48/100 with the U.S. average at 44/100.

Allentown New Roof Building Permits

Checking with your local city or county agency about permit requirements is a step you don’t want to ignore. In the majority of cases, a permit will be required before the new roofing project begins. There will most likely also be a required inspection. In Allentown, your point of contact is the City of Allentown, 435 Hamilton Street, phone (610) 439-5999. Visit this page on their website for important information.

Hiring a Roofing Contractor in Allentown

Hiring a contractor can take time as you’ll want to have someone with the experience and qualifications to do the job correctly from start to finish. There are a couple of ways to approach this step. If you know someone who has had a roof installed and can recommend the contractor’s services, that would be helpful as the person can vouch for the type of work, attitude, manner, and cost they received. If you resort to the yellow pages, contact 3 to 4 contractors to come to your property and give you a signed and dated estimate with all of the potential costs included.

When you choose a contractor, compare the actual contract against your estimate to ensure there are no hidden costs. Any deposit or up-front payment you may be required to pay should be clearly outlined on the contract with the remaining balance itemized. To verify your contractor’s credentials – a licensed and insured contractor is usually a requirement – use the free validation tool at the Pennsylvania Department of State website.

Types of Roofing Material for Your Allentown Home

The type of roofing material you choose is important and there are several reasons why property owners may choose one over the other. Since a new roof can be a significant financial investment, some want the best material for the lowest price. Others may want the high-end material that can stand up to weather and the test of time in durability and longevity. For others, it may be that the home is going on the market and the least expensive investment in a new roof is the goal. Whatever your reason, discuss the different options with your contractor and then decide which one best suits your needs. This short list will give you an idea of the most common types of roofing material available. Also keep in mind, the design of your home also factors into the type of roofing material that can or should be installed.

  • Asphalt shingles – one of the most used roofing materials due to its easy installation and low cost. Shingles generally have a lifespan of between 15 to 30 years.
  • Slate/clay tiles – this material adds a distinctive look to the roof and they have a long lifespan. Clay can remain viable for over 50 years while slate can keep going strong for 50 to 100 years. The downside is their weight, which requires a separate framework be installed to hold the tiles.
  • Metal – another material with at least 50 years of life. An added advantage to metal roofing is that it’s recyclable.
  • Fiber cement – although the material is a blend of several components, it can last 20 to 30 years and it is lighter in weight than slate or clay tiles.


Other Considerations for Your Allentown Roof Project

If you plan to finance the roofing project, it’s important to know that the estimate the contractor provides may not cover all of the costs. The main reason is until the current roofing material is removed, there’s no way to know if there is any damage underneath that will need to be repaired. Talk to your contractor about the possibility of roof repairs, and any other charges, so you’ll be prepared.

Plan your new roofing project wisely to include unforeseen problems as well as the time frame for installation. This can take anywhere from 2 days to a week, or more, depending on the square footage of your property.

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