Warning Signs You Need a New Shingle Roof

There’s no easy way to say it—roofing is expensive. Still, the several thousands of dollars required to re-roof a home almost seems reasonable when you consider just how important roofing is for a home. It’s the barrier that protects you from the wind, rain, sleet, and snow. It helps keeps you stay warm at night and safeguards everything you love from the outside. This is why it’s crucial to maintain your roof regularly. You also need to pay close attention to your roof so you can spot any signs of failure early enough to have new roofing installed before you run into bigger problems. Taking care of roof replacements promptly will keep your roof in better shape and help you avoid costly repairs in the future.

Curling or Discolored Shingles

One of the best signs that asphalt shingles are past their prime is curling or discoloration in the shingle. If you take a look up the slope of your roof and notice that many of the shingles seem to be lumpy, lifted up slightly or peeling back from the surface of the roof, there’s a good chance the shingles are past their prime and need to be replaced. Another symptom of old roofing is shingles that have lost most of their granules. They will look splotchy and discolored compared to new shingles. Keep an eye on the shingles for this discoloration and you’ll have a good idea of when a replacement should be made.

Another way to check if your shingles are losing granules is to take a look in your gutters and at the water that flows out of the gutters. Shingles tend to lose most of their granules at the end of their lifespan. If you notice a large amount of these granules in your gutters or water running out of them then you could be due for some new roofing.

Many Missing Shingles

It’s common for a shingle or two to come off in a rough wind storm, especially if a few of them weren’t nailed down properly. It isn’t common for this to happen in many locations around the roof prematurely, unless the install was very poor. If you’ve had your roof for at least five years, and you’re just now noticing that many shingles are coming off from your roof, it could be an indicator that the shingles are simply wearing out and that you have to have the whole lot replaced.

Old Age

If you have shingle roofing and you’ve had it for around 20 years or more, it’s probably getting close to needing replacement. 3-tab shingles typically only last up to 25 years under ideal conditions, while architectural shingles will make it to 30 in some conditions. If you haven’t noticed any of the warning signs above but your roof is fast approaching the top end of its age range, keep a close eye on it and prepare to need to do a full replacement.

Sagging Roof Sections

If you notice a portion of your roof sagging, you have a few major problems to concern yourself with. The first is failing shingles that aren’t keeping water out, the second is water damage from that failed roofing. It’s important if you notice sagging anywhere that you take steps to address the leak into your home as soon as possible. Sagging suggests that the sheathing or the actual framing holding the roof up is rotting away. This can only be repaired by removing the roofing and replacing any of the rotten pieces. It’s a step that you should take as soon as possible to avoid potential problems later on.

Dirty Sections of Roofing

If you notice sections of your roofing that is dramatically darker than other sections, this is likely because of damaging environmental conditions. Common issues are mold, mildew, and algae growth. Each of these issues not only discolor the roofing and make it look unattractive, but they can shorten the lifespan as well. If you notice dark patches in many areas around your roof you might be looking at a full shingle replacement pretty soon. Just keep an eye on the shingles, and wipe away any of the dark spots using a bleach mix to help prolong the roofing.

Each of the issues above are common symptoms of a failing shingle roof. Many times the solution is as simple as replacing the shingles, but if you wait too long you could face replacing some of the plywood underneath as well as other water-damaged sections of your home. Make sure you stay on top of the health of your roof and you can avoid dealing with more damage than you have to. Nobody wants to pay to have a new roof put on, but it’s much better than the alternative, which is paying to replace many different sections of your home after they sustain serious water damage.

1 Response

  1. April Cook

    We have been putting off having our roof replaced for a while now. After reading this I think it might be time to do it. I have noticed the curling that you mention. Can this lead to leaks if it rains? Thanks for this great information!

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