Corrugated Roofing

What is a Corrugated Roof?

When you think of corrugated roofing, do you envision a warehouse or a garden shed? You may want to broaden your perspective. Corrugated roofing is gaining popularity in residential buildings because of its low cost, durability, and unique look. Simple laying procedures make corrugated roofing a quick and easy do-it-yourself project, too.

Corrugated roofing structures are more rigid than flat roofing structures, providing more dimensional stability and structural integrity. The corrugated shape adds strength to otherwise lightweight materials. For instance, corrugated roofing can make a lightweight metal like aluminum sturdy enough to withstand the elements. Corrugated metal roofing is most commonly available in aluminum, stainless steel, and copper. These three metals differ in appearance, cost, and durability.

  • Corrugated aluminum roofing is your best bet in terms of value and quality. Aluminum roofing is durable, rust resistant without the need for additional coating, and can be painted to meet your design needs.
  • Corrugated steel roofing sheets come with a built-in, natural gray finish. Though some homeowners like the industrial look, changing the color of the sheets with paint can be challenging. Corrugated steel roofing is more expensive than aluminum roofing.
  • Corrugated copper roofing is easy to install and naturally resistant to rust. In fact, it will patina naturally over time. It is the most expensive type of corrugated roofing.

Resistant to cracking, shrinking and eroding, corrugated roofing systems can withstand extreme weather conditions including heavy snow, hail, and wildfires.

Cost of Corrugated Roofing

While the initial material and installation cost of a corrugated roof is higher than asphalt or other standard roofing material, the longevity is far superior–lasting two to three times longer than a typical nonmetal roof. Ranging from $300-700 per square foot, the cost of metal roofing can vary depending on the style you select–a product like steel being more moderately priced, while copper is more expensive. That said, metal roofing will increase the resale value of your home. Across the country, homeowners who invest in metal roofing get an average ROI of 85.9%. Metal roofing can also lower your insurance rates because of its fire resistance, especially in states like Texas and California that are vulnerable to wildfires.

Energy Efficiency of Corrugated Roofing

Traditional roofing products contribute an estimated 20 billion pounds of waste to U.S. landfills on an annual basis. Corrugated roofing is a more eco-friendly option as it is made from 30-60% recycled material (and is 100% recyclable) and can be installed over an existing roof, eliminating the out-of-pocket cost, as well as the environmental impact of taking off and disposing an old roof. Additionally, most metal roofing products make use of reflective pigment technology, making your home more energy efficient and decreasing your monthly utility bills by up to 40%. Reflective pigment technology comes in the form of a simple coating that enables metal roofs to reflect heat in the summer, while providing superior insulation in the winter. Metal roofing provides long-term energy savings, while decreasing your overall environmental impact.

Corrugated Roofing

Maintenance of Corrugated Roofing

Most corrugated products are made from galvanized steel. Galvanization is the process of applying a thin layer of zinc on the surface of the metal to protect it from rust (oxidization) and corrosion. At some point, long term exposure to the elements will deteriorate the protective finish and you’ll need to recoat. A simple polymer recoating will restore your corrugated roof to like-new conditions. To wash, use simple soap and water–a hose or a pressure washer can be used, but avoid abrasive tools like wire brushes or steel wool that can scratch your roof.

Common Concerns

Compared to other metal roofing systems, corrugated roofing tends to under-perform in the long-run. Extra insulation (spray foam is a good option) is necessary to keep your home quiet and to prevent heating and air conditioning from escaping.

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